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Posted by on in iDevBlogADay

Today, Cerebral Gardens introduces Watchdog for Xcode. Watchdog is a helpful utility for iOS and Mac OS X developers that monitors Xcode cache files (DerivedData) and cleans out stale files before they interfere with your builds.

If you’ve been building apps in Xcode for a while, you will see the value in Watchdog instantly as you are familiar with the weird errors that can happen with Xcode. If you’re new to using Xcode, you may not have run into these issues yet, but eventually you will and that’s when Watchdog will save immense time and frustration.

A Watchdog user will no longer see these weird issues:

  • Old images that you've replaced, still showing up in your app.
  • The DerivedData folder growing continuously over time, often taking up 10+ gigabytes of space.
  • Constants/Defines not updating in the app after you've changed them in the code.
  • Localization file changes not being seen.
  • Phantom breakpoints and/or breakpoints stopping on the wrong line.
  • Xcode refusing to run a build on your device, only reporting something obscure like: "Error launching remote program: No such file or directory"

Sometimes the cause is related to your version control system updating files without Xcode noticing. Sometimes it’s random. Regardless, the result is the same: a bad build, time wasted, a frustrated developer, or even worse, an annoyed customer.

These errors can be mind numbing. Let Watchdog be your guard against these errors so you never again have your time wasted.

Watchdog gives you truly clean builds, saves time, and your sanity. It guards, protects and, most importantly, prevents.

Download Watchdog for Xcode.

Posted by on in iDevBlogADay

I'm sure by now most of you have heard of App.Net. A new microblogging type service that aims to be much more. At first glance it looks a lot like Twitter, but it is much better in a few fundamental ways.

The first thing you'll notice is that you have 256 characters per 'post' instead of Twitter's 140. It is very liberating. Think in terms of 140 characters, and then actually spell out all of the words, use punctuation and clearly articulate your point.

Ok, who's kidding? That's actually the second thing you'll notice. First you'll notice that you have to pay for an account! WHHHHHAAAAAAATTTT? Pay? Money? For a social network? Aren't they all free? - No, social networks such as Twitter, Facebook, Linked In, and pretty much most of the others (excluding Ping1) are not free. You don't pay with money, but you pay with time, attention, and the loss of personal privacy. With most social networks, you are not the customer, you are the product being sold2. With App.Net, you are the customer, and so you're the one paying with money. A normal member account is $50 per year. Which, is arguably cheap compared to Twitter. WHHHHHAAAAAAATTTT?

Let's take a quick look using some rough guesstimates comparing just 1 metric that you use to pay for your Twitter account: Time. Twitter is now starting to sell a lot of ads (promoted tweets) on its network. They've even started to push into selling a high volume of small accounts to users such as you and me, not just to the big guys. They've been giving away $100 starter accounts to promote their ad service. So, here's where we start to guess some numbers, we'll attempt to guess low in order to give Twitter the benefit of the doubt.

  • Assumption 1: on an average day, you see 15 tweets that are ads (promoted tweets, spam tweets, etc).
  • Assumption 2: it takes you 2 seconds to read/recognize and discard/move on.
  • Assumption 3: your time is worth more than $20/hour.

This means, over the course of a year, you're wasting 365 days * 15 tweets * 2 seconds = 10950 seconds = 182.5 minutes = 3 hours. For a monetary cost of over $60/year. And I know my time is worth a lot more than $20/hour.

This example ignores the cost you pay with your lack of privacy; Twitter and Facebook both track you as you move from site to site on the Internet, even when you're logged out!3

Two other benefits of App.Net that I won't get into detail on are: conversation views — much improved as you can see the whole thing, instead of having it forked into uselessness. It's a platform, not just a Twitter clone. Other apps and services that aren't possible with Twitter are being built right now on top of App.Net.

So, I encourage you to get on board with app.net, own your content, be the customer, and if you act pretty fast, get the name you always wanted....

Follow me on App.Net as @davewood and @cerebralgardens.

Footnotes:

1. No one uses Ping so there's no cost in time. (back)

2. Original quote via Gruber (back)

3. Original research (back)


This post is part of iDevBlogADay, a group of indie iPhone development blogs featuring two posts per day. You can keep up with iDevBlogADay through the web site, RSS feed, or Twitter.

Posted by on in News

Our latest app, Party Doodles was recently featured on TUAW's Origins Stories. The web series takes a closer look at the reasons why developers create their apps. Our very own Dave sat down with TUAW's Victor Agreda, Jr. to discuss how Party Doodles came to be and why it is such a unique app. Check it out!

Posted by on in iDevBlogADay

WWDC 2012 sold out in less than 2 hours, a record that had been easily predicted by many. Tickets went on sale at about 8:30 Eastern time and were sold out before most people on the west coast had even woken up. The demand for tickets was obviously extremely high, and the supply was limited to about 5000. How can Apple solve this for next year?

Of course, the first question is, does Apple even want to solve this. I believe they do. They have information they want to put into the hands (and heads) of developers, as many developers as possible. That's why they release the videos shortly after the event. That's why they've had the free Tech Talks in various cities. So yes, Apple does want to get the information out to many developers as they can. So it's to their advantage to increase the supply of tickets for WWDC.

Posted by on in iDevBlogADay

I've been at WWDC for the last week. This was my first WWDC but it certainly won't be my last. For my iDevBlogADay post I'm going to try and share some of the things I learnt over the last week. Nothing that's covered by the NDA of course.

1) It was great to finally meet some of the big wigs in the community. Drinking beer with Jeff LaMarche and the other MartianCraft guys. Hanging out with the Empirical Development guys that I've been working with for most of the last year was awesome. (Empirical is hiring BTW, so check us out if you're looking for work). And getting to pitch Party Doodles to Eli Hodapp (of Touch Arcade) and Victor Agreda, Jr of (TUAW) in person was amazing. I'm sure it helped that Apple basically used Party Doodles as an example of how to do an AirPlay game correctly.